Rib Wrangling

Rib Wrangling – VSFX 502: Programming 3D Models & Shaders, Fall 2012

Rib Wrangling: Final RenderRib Wrangling Final

The final image of the abstract composition, rendered with Pixar’s RenderMan studio through the rib protoocol.

Animation Key RIB Script

Tween “from” 1 “to” 2 “frames” 30
Tween “output” “all”
#Tween “output” 1
#——————————————
KeyFrameBegin 1
Projection “perspective” “fov” 50
ShadingRate 1
Translate 0 0 12.747
Rotate -30.657 1 0 0
Rotate 360.0 0 1 0
Translate 0.5 -0.0 0.0
Scale 1 1 -1

TransformEnd
WorldEnd
KeyFrameEnd
#——————————————
KeyFrameBegin 2
Projection “perspective” “fov” 50
ShadingRate 1
Translate 0 0 12.747
Rotate -30.657 1 0 0
Rotate 46.847 0 1 0
Translate 0.5 -0.0 0.0
Scale 1 1 -1

Rib Wrangling: Specular RenderRib Wrangling Specularity

This image shows the specularity of the composition by showing the highlights that result from the lights.

Rib Wrangling: Diffuse RenderRib Wrangling Diffuse

Here we see the diffusion of light across the surfaces of the shapes.

Rib Wrangling: Normals RenderRib Wrangling Normals

This images shows the direction of the normals, which can be helpful when assigning more complex shaders and textures to the objects. The normals will help determine how light bounces off of an object, and can be delineated based on the direction of each face of an object.

Rib Wrangling: Gamma-CorrectionRib Wrangling Final
These two images depict the effect that gamma can have on a final render; the image above shows an image that has a proper gamma correction, whereas the image to the right has not been corrected. Notice the stark contrast between the two, and how much darker an image without a gamma correction can be. The image above has a gamma correction of 2.0.

Rib Wrangling: No Gamma-CorrectionRib Wrangling No Gamma

Rib Wrangling: Lighting and Coloring Renderscolor/light

The two renders above show part of the process of adding a colored light source to the render by way of the rib language. The colors were created by adjusting the red, green and blue values within the text editor. All of the color in this project has been created with lights only.

Colored-Light RIB Script

LightSource “pointlight” 3
“float intensity” 1.0
“color lightcolor” [2.5 1.0 1.4]
“point from” [0.0 10 3]
LightSource “pointlight” 3 #back
“float intensity” 1.0
“color lightcolor” [4.5 1.0 1.4]
“point from” [-1.5 5.5 -3]
LightSource “ambientlight” 0.8
“float intensity” 1.0
“color lightcolor” [0.4 1.0 2]
LightSource “pointlight” 6
“float intensity” 10.0
“color lightcolor” [3.0 1.0 3.0]
“point from” [1 -2.5 0.0]

color/light_purple

color/light_blue

Rib Wrangling: Depth of Field Rendersrib/depth_1

The Depth of Field Renders (above and below) demonstrate the experimentation with various depths of field with the camera lens. Similarly to the color and light adjustments, the depths of field were manipulated by the change of their respective values in the text editor.

Depth of Field RIB Script

Translate 0 0 12.747
Rotate -30.657   1 0 0
Rotate  46.847   0 1 0
Translate 0.5 -0.0 0.0
Scale 1 1 -1

DepthOfField 5 6 9.5

rib/depth_2

Having always struggled with Photography, it took some trial-and-error to achieve the look of the final render. I am still striving to understand the correlations of the various number values to the effect they create in the depth of field!

rib/dept_3

Rib Wrangling: Lighting RenderRib Wrangling lights_original

The three lighting renders, shown above, and two below, have light sources that have been embedded into the original rib file for the cube-shape. This creates the illusion that the objects are being lit or illuminated from within, which technically they are!

Rib Wrangling: Occlusion RenderRib Wrangling Occlusion

This is an Occlusion render that is supposed to exhibit the contact shadows between each of the surfaces and where they meet, however, it appears to be very subtle. The problem here may have been the setting for “visibility” or “raytracing” as opposed to rendering through the composition’s point cloud.

Rib Wrangling: Original RenderRib Wrangling Original
This is a render of the original composition, just as it was created! After playing around with the translation and rotation of the object with the intent of understanding how the rib language, works, I selected this image to be the [first] final. I chose this image as the initial final composition because of its negative space.

Box RIB Script

AttributeBegin #lower
Rotate 180 1 0 0
Polygon “P” [-0.5 0 -0.5 -0.5 0 0.5 0.5 0 0.5 0.5 0 -0.5]
“st” [0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0]
AttributeEnd

AttributeBegin #right
Translate 0.5 0.5 0
Rotate 90 0 0 1
Rotate 180 1 0 0
Polygon “P” [-0.5 0 -0.5 -0.5 0 0.5 0.5 0 0.5 0.5 0 -0.5]
“st” [0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0]
AttributeEnd

AttributeBegin #top
Translate 0 1 0
Polygon “P” [-0.5 0 -0.5 -0.5 0 0.5 0.5 0 0.5 0.5 0 -0.5]
“st” [0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0]
AttributeEnd

AttributeBegin #left
Translate -0.5 0.5 0
Rotate 90 0 0 1
Polygon “P” [-0.5 0 -0.5 -0.5 0 0.5 0.5 0 0.5 0.5 0 -0.5]
“st” [0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0]
AttributeEnd
AttributeEnd

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